St Botolph's Church, Lullingstone  Church

Image Source: John Vigar

 

This is not a private chapel, and may be visited at all times, even though you walk across the private lawn of Lullingstone Castle to reach it. From the south the eighteenth-century alterations made to the two-cell Norman may be clearly seen. The walls were raised to accommodate an elaborate plaster ceiling, and a south porch was added. Yet these were not the first alterations to have taken place: in the sixteenth century a north chapel was added to the chancel to take the tomb of Sir John Peche (d. 1522) which lies under an arch between chancel and chapel. Sir John was also responsible for building the rood screen, which contains carvings of peach stones as a rebus (or pun) on his name. This screen was embellished in the eighteenth century when the wooden balustrade was added to the top. There are further monuments of note; on the south side of the chancel is the large monument to Sir Percyvall Hart (d. 1581) whilst in the north chapel is the splendid chest tomb of Sir George Hart (d. 1587) in complete contrast to the Gothick wall panel opposite commemorating his descendant Percyvall Hart (d. 1738). It is good to know that the Hart Dyke family connection with the church continues, for here true continuity of social history may be studied as in no other Kent church.

 

 

Church Data

 

1851 Census Details

 

Seating Capacity: 132

Morning Attendance: 34

Afternoon Attendance: 22

Evening Attendance: No service

 

Architecture Details

 

Original Build Date/Architect: Medieval

Restoration: -

Second Restoration: -

 

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Queries Relating to this Church

 

Whilst I am happy to answer any historical or architectural questions for all churches on this site, I cannot answer day-to-day queries relating to Family History, services, burials etc. Please see the Contact page, for details of other organisations that may be able to assist with those sort of enquiries.

 

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